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Yes on 21 - Renters and Homeowners United to Keep Families in Their Homes, Sponsored by AIDS Healthcare Foundation
 

I. Aesthetics & Messaging

Yes on 21 Aesthetics

Bold. Consistent. Concise. Persuasive. Humanizing.

Yes on 21 Messaging

Powerful. Informative. Never academic. Honest.

Proposition 21 aims to educate voters about the facts vs. myths of responsible rent control, share how the housing-affordability crisis impacts all Californians, and encourage people to vote for Proposition 21 on Election Day 2020.

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II. Our Logo

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Spanish
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Logo Layout

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Two layouts for the logo exist - vertical and horizontal. Use our logo’s horizontal layout whenever possible. Vertical should only be used when there isn’t enough space for the horizontal variant.

Note: All logo rules apply to promotional items along with digital and print assets.

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Logo Colors

Use orange border logos on light/white backgrounds.

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Use borderless logos on dark backgrounds.

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Use a one color option ONLY when print colors are limited.

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Logo Color Codes

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Logo Dos and Don'ts

Do:

Do use clear space around the logo
(FIGURE 2a)

Do use the appropriate layout (vertical or horizontal) depending on the
materials

Do use the logo on all assets
(digital and print)

Do share the logo with our vendors

Do use the correct colors

Do contact Ben Nicholson if you have questions: [email protected]

Don't

Don’t overcrowd the logo (FIGURE 2b)

Don’t stretch, skew, rotate, or alter the logo (FIGURE 2c)

Don’t place the logo on backgrounds so it is invisible or hard to see (see above)

Don’t make the logo too small to read
(FIGURE 2d)

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III. Color

The campaign follows a strict color palette. Branding should be limited to the following color scheme whenever possible. At minimum, the palette should be accentuated if additional colors are used to complement the existing scheme.

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Logo Usage Dos and Don'ts

Do:

1. Do stick to the palette as much as possible

2. Do accent or emphasize Prop Blue as much as possible

3. Do combine colors within the Proposition 21 palette that compli-ment one another (FIGURE 3a)

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Don't:

1. Don’t use clashing colors outside our color palette (FIGURE 3b)

2. Don’t emphasize secondary colors over primary colors (FIGURE 3c)

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IV. Typography

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Logo Usage Dos and Don'ts

Do:

Do use FatFrank occasionally for major headings (FIGURE 4a)

Do use Vonnes Condensed for minor headings and Vonnes Book for body text (FIGURE 4b)

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Don't:

Don’t use random fonts in standard Proposition 21 branding

Don’t use letter-spacing and line-height in ways that make text unclear (FIGURE 4b)

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V. Composition

In general, design layout should elegantly balance content with white space to create readable, informative documents that  never overwhelm voters with information.

Too much white space can create needlessly expansive content (FIGURE 5a).

Not enough white space will alienate voters with clutter

(FIGURE 5b, opposite).

Images and text should captivate Proposition 21’s target demographic with clear
narrative. Everything from personal experience to state-wide messaging should be delivered as a relatable story.

Place the voter in a position of understanding and empathy through content organization and priority. Highlight meaningful messages up front.

Let voters discover secondary information on their own bydrawing them to primary
content.

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FIGURE 5a

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FIGURE 5a

VI. Iconography and Design Elements

Iconography and Design Elements should reflect the design aesthetic implied by our logo. The Yes On Prop 21 look and feel is bold and accessible; never to be confused with “corporate”. Our look may appear professional, but its inherent message expresses action, and an emotional weight absent from profit-driven institutions. The campaign is an important, progressive cause. Keep this in mind while designing.

The strength of our branding comes from the creative variety that springs from restriction. On the surface, Yes On Prop 21’s logo may appear simple in coloring and appearance, but an attentive eye will find inspiration in the most basic, formal design.

1. Utilize rounded edges found in our checkmark to create interesting compliments to sharp edges.

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2. Duplicate iconography to create backgrounds and novel patterns.

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3. Reference elements to form new shapes and concepts.

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4. Draw from stock illustrations with similar characteristics.

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VII. Illustration, Graphics & Charts

While public policy may be the guiding principle behind Proposition 21’s campaign, it often lacks the concise language of sharp design. Whenever possible, illustration should accompany and build on complex issues that are otherwise difficult for a voter to understand.

1. Draw voters to information with inviting illustrations. Hold their attention with visual humor and creativity.

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2. Captivate voters with kinetic motion graphics and gifs.

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3. Make datasets easier to understand with colorful graphs and charts.

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VIII. Photography

Although a plethora of stock photography exists under the categories of “renters,” “apartments,” “evictions,” and the like, Proposition 21 seeks to humanize hardships faced by tenants in daily life.

1. Whenever possible, use photos of individuals, not stock models.

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2. Choose photos that elicit or express an emotional response.

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3. Depict real-world scenarios in a genuine light. Avoid staged or
ultra-pristine landscapes free of human presence.

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